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Eller College Home > Eller MBA Programs > Full-Time MBA > Curriculum > The Eller MBA Curriculum > Electives
Full-Time MBA

Curriculum Electives

Follow a link below for electives by department, or scroll down for all electives:

All electives are worth 3 units of credit, unless otherwise indicated.

Accounting

ACCT 500A - Intermediate Financial Accounting
Description: Theory and methodology involved in contemporary accounting for assets, liabilities, stockholders' equity, net income and funds, analysis and interpretation of financial statements.
Prerequisite(s):  6 credit hours of introductory accounting. ACCT 500A is prerequisite to ACCT 500B. 

ACCT 500B - Intermediate Financial Accounting
Description: Theory and methodology involved in contemporary accounting for assets, liabilities, stockholders' equity, net income and funds, analysis and interpretation of financial statements.
Prerequisite(s):  ACCT 500A is prerequisite to ACCT 500B.

ACCT 501 - Advanced Accounting

Description:  Theory and methodology involved in the preparation of consolidated financial statements; accounting for mergers and acquisitions; translation of foreign currency financial statements; accounting for derivatives and hedging; accounting for partnerships; governmental accounting. Graduate-level requirements include a special project.
Prerequisite(s):  ACCT 500B.

ACCT 510 -- Principles of Profit Planning and Control
Description: Examination of the value of managerial accounting in organizational decision-making and control, addressing specific managerial accounting problems and their solutions.
Prerequisite(s):  ACCT 550; 6 credit hours of introductory accounting.

ACCT 520 - Introduction to Federal Taxation
Description: Principles of federal income taxation, with emphasis on how individuals are taxed; additional topics. Graduate-level requirements include a special project and readings concerning current events and U.S. tax policy.
Prerequisite(s):  ACCT 550; 6 credit hours of introductory accounting.

ACCT 522 - Advanced Federal Taxation

Introduction to advanced topics: taxation of corporations and stockholders' transactions in stocks, taxation of partnerships and fiduciaries, gift and estate taxation. Graduation-level requirements include a special project.

Prerequisite(s): ACCT 520.

ACCT 525 - Accounting Theory Institutions

Theoretical analysis of the role of accounting and taxation in society. Examines existing accounting and taxing institutions involved in policy making and standard setting. International issues are included.
Prerequisite(s):  ACCT 520.

ACCT 528 - Taxation of Partnerships

Description:  Concepts and principles of partnership income taxation and the uses of partnerships for tax planning.
Prerequisite(s):  ACCT 420, ACCT 520.

ACCT 529 - International Accounting and Taxation

Description: Accounting and taxation viewed from an international perspective, including comparison of various national standards, laws, and business practices. Also includes examination of standards issued by worldwide accounting organizations.
Prerequisite(s):  ACCT 522 or consent of instructor.

ACCT 531 - Principles of Auditing

Description: Graduate-level requirements include a special project.
Prerequisite(s):  ACCT 500B; MBA candidates only.

ACCT 554 - Analysis FIN Statement

Description:  Structured analysis of financial statements; forecasting of income and cash flows; pro-forma financial statements; firm valuation using discounted cash flows and discounted residual income methods; comparative valuation analysis; credit analysis. Graduate-level requirements include a special project.
Prerequisite(s):  ACCT 540/545

ACCT 552 - Taxes and Business Strategy

Description:  This course gives students the tools to identify and evaluate tax planning opportunities, focusing on the effect of taxes on business decisions, including mergers and acquisitions, multinational tax planning, electronic commerce, investments, compensation strategies, and the choice of organizational form.

ACCT 553 - Tax Research

Description:  Review of how tax law is created, the motivating forces behind the creation of these laws, and the relative significance of various authoritative tax sources that exist in addition to the law. Includes research of current tax issues and the implications to business operations as a result of these issues.
Prerequisite(s):  ACCT 520.

ACCT 572A - Accounting for Not-For-Profit Entities
Description:  Accounting concepts and procedures for governmental and other not-for-profit entities, including financial analysis and reconciliation to for-profit accounting principles. Graduate-level requirements include leading presentations, participation in online platform, and contributing supplementary articles on current issues for class discussion.
Prerequisite(s):  ACCT 550

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Business Administration

BNAD 596C -- Global Business Experience  (2 units)
Description:  This course will expose students to a variety of international business perspectives, including, economic, social, political and cultural, through a 7-10 day trip to a particular world region. Students will be expected to pay their own travel expenses.
Grading:  Regular or alternative grades can be awarded for this course: A B C D E or S P C D E.
May be repeated:  for credit 1 time (maximum 2 enrollments).
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring, Summer.

BNAD 579B- MBA Advanced consulting projects (3 units)

Description: The goal of this course is to provide second year MBA students, along with M.S. and Ph.D. students from colleges of science and engineering, with an advanced, multi-disciplinary consulting experience that utilizes and builds upon the skills acquired in BNAD 597A. This advanced consulting project enriches the Eller MBA experiential learning component, providing students with the opportunity to engage in an advanced consulting project as part of the 2nd year curriculum. Course includes one or more field trips.

Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor

BNAD 522-Global Economic Development (2 Units)
Description: This course will examine policies that can be pursued to promote global economic development. While a particular focus will be placed on what the United States and other developed countries can do to support less developed countries in becoming more competitive and reducing poverty, we will also dedicate time to reviewing domestic economic reforms that can be taken by less developed countries. The US decision­ making process and its impact on the extent to which the US is able to trade with and provide foreign assistance to other countries will be closely examined throughout the course. Prerequisite(s): Must be MBA or Law Student

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Economics

ECON 501A - Microeconomic Theory

Description:  Value and distribution.
Prerequisite(s):  ECON 361, ECON 521.

ECON 501B - Microeconomic Theory

Description:  General equilibrium and welfare economics.
Prerequisite(s):  ECON 501A.

ECON 501C - Microeconomic Theory

Description: Other selected topics.
Prerequisite(s):  ECON 501B.

ECON 502A - Macroeconomic Theory

Description: National income analysis.
Prerequisite(s):  ECON 332, ECON 521.

ECON 504 - Production Economics

Description:  Theory of the firm and industry; single and multiple products; risk and uncertainty.
Prerequisite(s):  ECON 300 or ECON 361; MATH 113.
May be repeated:  for a total of 6 units of credit.
Identical to:  AREC 504; AREC is home department.

ECON 508 - Applied Economic Analysis

Description: Uses economic history to show how research methods in economics are used to analyze data collected through empirical observation.
Prerequisite(s):  ECON 501A; ECON 520.

ECON 512 - Economic Policy of Developing Countries

Description:  The role of policies in economic growth and development. The impact of commodity, factor market and macroeconomic policies on economic incentives.
Prerequisite(s):  ECON 361; MATH 113.

ECON 513 - Consumer Economics and Price Analysis

Description: Theory of the consumer, demand, and market equilibrium, and welfare analysis.

ECON 517 - Introductory Mathematical Statistics for Economists
Description:  This course covers the basic mathematical statistics topics necessary for a deep understanding of applied econometrics. Topics include random variables probability theory, probability and density functions, sampling hypothesis testing, and point and interval estimation.
Identical to:  AREC 517; AREC is home department.

ECON 518 - Introduction to Econometrics

Description: Statistical methods in estimating and testing economic models; single and simultaneous equation estimation, identification, forecasting, and problems caused by violating classical regression model assumptions. Graduate-level requirements include a research project that involves applications of econometric methods to the estimating and testing of behavioral models or simulation studies of the statistical properties of an econometric estimation technique. Advanced degree credit available for non-majors only.

ECON 519A - Mathematical Economics  (2 units)
Description:  Introduction to the theory and methods of mathematical economics and its applications. Designed primarily for entering graduate students majoring in economics.
Prerequisite(s):  or Concurrent registration, ECON 520; consult department before enrolling.

ECON 520 - Theory of Quantitative Methods in Economics

Description:  Introduction to the basic concepts of statistics and their application to the analysis of economic data. Designed primarily for entering graduate students majoring in economics.
Prerequisite(s):
 Consult department before enrolling.

ECON 522A - Econometrics

Description: The theory of econometric estimation of single and simultaneous equation models.
Prerequisite(s):  ECON 520.

ECON 522B - Econometrics

Description:  Additional topics in the theory of econometric estimation of single and simultaneous equation models.
Prerequisite(s):  ECON 522A.

ECON 525 - Topics in Economic History of the U.S.

Description:  Examines the economic history and development of the United States, including roles of legal and cultural institutions, changes in output mix, government regulation, income distribution, monetary policy, and demographic factors. Graduate-level requirements include a research paper or additional problem sets, depending on exact course content.

ECON 531 - Games and Decisions

Description: Introduction to decision theory and game theory and their application to various economic situations under conditions of complete and incomplete information. Graduate-level requirements include a research paper.

ECON 534 - Industrial Analysis and New Venture Development

Description:  Value maximization; simulation of value distribution; sources of venture capital; timing of initial public offering; new venture ownership structuring.
Prerequisite(s):  ECON 550, FIN 510, MKTG 500. Open to entrepreneurship program students only.

ECON 535 - Public Sector Economics

Description:  The influence of governmental revenue and expenditure decisions on resource allocation, income distribution, and aggregate economic performance. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research project on a major current public sector issue.
Prerequisite(s):  ECON 550.

ECON 543 - International Trade Theory

Description: General equilibrium analysis of product and input markets of international trade, tariffs, commercial policy, and growth and the welfare aspects of each. Graduate-level requirements include a research project and different tests.

ECON 549 - Applied Econometric Analysis

Description: Econometric model-building, estimation, forecasting and simulation for problems in agricultural and resource economics. Applications with actual data and models emphasized.
Prerequisite(s):  ECON 518.

ECON 554 - Innovation and Technology Strategy  (3 units)
Description: Study of how new knowledge or new ideas can be transformed into commercial success.
Grading:  Regular grades are awarded for this course: A B C D E.
Prerequisite(s): ECON 500, ECON 550, BNAD 510, consent of instructor.
Usually offered: Fall.

ECON 560 - Industrial Organization

Description:  Structure, conduct, and performance of American industry; governmental institutions and policies affecting business. Graduate-level requirements include an applied research project that examines the impact of public policy on industry performance.
Prerequisite(s):  ECON 550.

ECON 561 - Economics of Regulated Industry

Description:  Economic analysis of the regulated sector of the American economy, including communications, transportation and energy industries; impact of existing and alternative public policies. Graduate-level requirements include a case of regulation/deregulation or other approved research project in regulatory theory or policy. Advanced credit available for non-majors only.
Prerequisite(s):  ECON 550.

ECON 575 - Economic Evaluation of Water and Environmental Policy

Description:  Theory and application of economic concepts needed to evaluate water and environmental laws and policies; including benefit cost analysis, externalities, public goods and valuation methodologies. Case studies include federal, state, tribal and international water and environmental policies.

ECON 576 - Natural Resource Law and Economics

Description:   Advanced economic and legal analysis of environmental and natural resource policies.

ECON 577 - Advanced Topics In the Economics of Environmental Regulation

Description:  Advanced economic theory of environmental policy. Topics include regulation of air and water pollution under imperfect competition, imperfect information, costly enforcement, uncertainty, and the use of alternative regulatory instruments.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 113, ECON 361.

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Finance

FIN 512 - Advanced Corporate Finance

Description:  Financial theory applied to capital structure; investment decisions; corporate valuation; and corporate financial policies.
Prerequisite(s):  FIN 510A/B or FIN 511.

FIN 513 - Fundamental Valuation Modeling

Description: This course is designed to provide students with a hands-on introduction to fundamental valuation, and financial decision making. The course objectives are to integrate and operationalize the various topics included in managerial finance, i.e., the financing and investment decisions. The course builds upon and reinforces the theoretical and institutional framework presented in the first semester core courses, primarily through the vehicle of case studies.
Prerequisite(s):  FIN 510A or FIN 511.

FIN 514 - Financial Management of Multinationals
Description:  International finance markets and the financial management of the multinational firm.
Prerequisite(s):  FIN 510A/B or FIN 511.

FIN 515 - Venture Capital

Description:  Topics include dynamics/complexities of venture capital (private equity), management of VC funds, the VC underwriting process/function, and risk/return management. Class is limited to 30 students.
Prerequisite(s):  FIN 510A/B or FIN 511 and consent of instructor.

FIN 518 - Investment Banking

Description:  Examines the role of financial institutions and economic activities. In-depth evaluation analysis recognizing that the value of assets may depend on who controls them.
Prerequisite(s):  FIN 510 A/B or FIN 511.

FIN 521 - Investment Analysis

Description:  Portfolio theory with applications to the markets for equities, fixed income securities, and options. Risk analysis and investment strategies.
Prerequisite(s):  FIN 510 A/B or FIN 511.

FIN 522 - Derivative Models

Description:  Risk, return, and price behavior of securities in competitive markets. Financial futures, options, and other financial and real investments.
Prerequisite(s):  FIN 521.

FIN 523A - Applied Investment Management

Description:  To apply classroom learning to an active management of a student managed portfolio. Graduate-level requirements include structured management and leadership positions for the graduate students as the senior members of "investment firms."

FIN 523B - Applied Investment Management

Description:  To apply classroom learning to an active management of a student managed portfolio. Graduate-level requirements include providing management and leadership positions for the graduate students as the senior members of "investment firms."

FIN 525 - Empirical Methods in Finance

Description:  This course is to familiarize the students with the database and various statistical methods needed to undertake practitioner-type research in finance.
Prerequisite(s):  FIN 510 A/B or FIN 511.

FIN 528 - Public and Non-Profit Financial Management

Description:  Advanced issues in public-sector financial management.
Prerequisite(s):  PA 508, FIN 510 A/B or FIN 511.
Identical to:  PA 528; PA is home department.

FIN 532 - Corporate Financial Strategy

Description:  Financial decision-making in corporations. Case studies.
Prerequisite(s):  FIN 513.

FIN 536 - New Venture Finance

Description:  Role of entrepreneurship and innovation in economic growth. Development of new venture idea and assessment of financial requirements and potential.
Prerequisite(s):  ECON 550, FIN 510A/B or FIN 511.

FIN 539 - Planning of New Ventures

Description: New venture development, financial projections, resource assessment, and long-range planning. Open only to students in the entrepreneurship program.
Prerequisite(s):  FIN 510A/B or FIN 511, MKTG 510.

FIN 541B - Fixed Income (2 units)

Description:  This is the second semester of a two-semester course. It is designed to introduce students to fixed income portfolio management. The course objective is to provide students with a set of tools to analyze fixed income markets.
Prerequisite(s):  FIN 541A.

FIN 542 - Fixed Income: Markets, Instruments, and Strategies  (3 units)
Description:  This course is designed to introduce students to fixed income markets and securities. The basic analytical tools of fixed income valuation are also presented.
Prerequisite(s):  FIN 510A/B or FIN 511.

FIN543 - High Yield and Distressed Debt

Description: To provide a broad overview and introduction to nontraditional fixed income asset classes. The asset classes covered will include (but are not limited to): high-yield debt, leveraged loans, convertible bonds, collateralized bond obligations, and credit derivative swaps, vulture investing, debtor-in-possession financing.

Prerequisite(s):  FIN 510A/B or FIN 511.

FIN 551 - International Markets and Institutions

Description:  This course is designed to introduce students to international financial markets and institutions, focusing on banking, investments, and trade. An overview to these topics is provided through classroom lectures and readings in Tucson, prior to site visits in London, England. As a major centre for international financing, London offers an opportunity to experience the many dimensions of the international markets from a global perspective. Graduate-level requirements include a position paper.
Prerequisite(s):  FIN 510A/B or FIN 511, FIN 512.

FIN 552 - Special Topics in Finance (see below)
Description:  To address current issues in finance. Graduate-level requirements include participation in management and leadership positions for the graduate students as the senior members of "investment firms".

Prerequisites:  FIN 510A/B or 511.

FIN 556 - Investment Research

Description:  Provide an opportunity for students to prepare equity research reports for investment firms. Graduate-level requirements include supervisory responsibilities and will be required additional research in addition to expectations of undergraduate students.

Prerequisite:   FIN 513.

FIN 560 - Real Property

Description: The focus of this course is on evaluating, financing, and managing investments in real property.
Prerequisite(s):  FIN 513; open only to students admitted to an Eller graduate program.

FIN 561- Real Estate Development

Description:  This course covers the five major types of real estate development—land development, residential properties, retail projects, office complexes, and industrial properties—with an emphasis on real estate development in the southwestern United States. The provides students with opportunities to interact with developers, investors, and land use planners, both in the classroom and during visits to projects in Southern Arizona and Phoenix.
Grading:  Regular grades are awarded for this course: A B C D E.

Prerequisite:   FIN 560; open only to students admitted to an Eller graduate program.

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Management and Organizations

MGMT 512A - Management of Technology

Description:  To provide practical experience and perspective in the challenging and complex world of technology management. The course content will include lectures, seminars, case analysis, shared personal experience from senior managers of technology-based enterprises, course specific academic literature, and guest speakers. Graduate-level requirements include two papers to be graded where indicated in the syllabus.
Identical to:  ENGR 512A; ENGR is home department.

MGMT 512B – Management of Technology II
Description: To provide and practical and in depth understanding of management at the first and second levels, the integration of product to market requirements and synchronization of organizations in the challenging and complex world of technology management. The course will include team role playing, in depth (deep dive) analysis of product and organizational process which have insured the sustained and successful performance of technology companies. The content will include lectures, seminars, shared personal experience from senior managers of technology-based enterprises, course specific academic literature, and guest speakers.
Identical to ENGR 512B; ENGR is Home Department.
MGMT 525 - Organizational Theory
Description:  Survey course in the origins, development, and maturation of organizational analysis.
Identical to:  SOC 525; SOC is home department.
MGMT 530 – Human Resource Policies
Description: Integrative, case-oriented course focusing on problems and policies in the procurement, development, compensation, and motivation of personnel.
MGMT 534 - Industrial Analysis and New Venture Development  
Description:  Value maximization; simulation of value distribution; sources of venture capital; timing of initial public offering; new venture ownership structuring.
Prerequisite(s):  ECON 500, FIN 511, MKTG 500. Open to entrepreneurship program students only.
Identical to:  ECON 534; ECON is home department.

MGMT 535 - International Management

Description:  Broaden perspectives on globalizing business and international integration. Enhance analytical and communication skills in approaching and resolving international issues.

MGMT 539 - Planning of New Ventures

Description:  New venture development, financial projections, resource assessment, and long-range planning. Open only to students in the entrepreneurship program.
Prerequisite(s):  FIN 511, MKTG 510.

MGMT 538 - Health Care Organization and Management

Description:  This course focuses primarily on the organization and management of health care organizations and systems, including implications for health care policy. Key areas of discussion for each topic will be: a) how health care organizations and systems have been organized and managed, b) how they might be organized and managed more effectively, and c) the role and impact of health care policy for improving the delivery of needed services to target populations.

MGMT 543 - White Collar and Organizational Crime

Description:  The nature and distribution of white collar and organizational crime. Sociological and economic explanations for crime in organizational settings. Societal response and control mechanisms.
Identical to:  PA 543; PA is home department.

MGMT 547 - Corporate Strategy

Description:  This course provides a "real world" perspective into the generation of corporate strategies and the executive decision processes that facilitate the strategy's implementation.  In addition to discussing and analyzing corporate strategic principles, we will review strategic issues inherent in the current state of the traditional and electronic marketplaces, identify barriers to success, and develop futuristic deployment strategies.

MGMT 548 - Healthcare Entrepreneurship

Description:   In this course you will focus your business and entrepreneurial skills on contemporary healthcare challenges and opportunities. Through a series of readings, case studies, discussions, guest speakers, and assignments, you will explore a number of contemporary healthcare problems and identify entrepreneurial solutions to these problems.

MGMT 550 Training and Development
Description: Examines employee training and development as a systematic planned strategy for continuous expansion of employee competence, broadly defined in order to meet organizational and individual goals.
MGMT 564 - Negotiation
Description: Explore the major concepts and theories of psychology of bargaining and negotiation, and the dynamics of interpersonal and intergroup conflict and its resolution.
MGMT 565 - Managing for Quality Improvement
Description: Operational aspect of quality improvement. Topics include statistical process control, quality management programs.. Graduate-level requirements includes a report.
Identical to: MIS 565; MIS is home department.
MGMT 566 - Advanced Negotiation
Description: This course will explore the academic topic of negotiations in more depth than MGMT/LAW 564, which is a prerequisite for this course. It is designed to provide the student with a much deeper understanding of the topic. This course is both skills and knowledge based. The student will be exposed to cutting-edge issues in the research of negotiations.
MGMT 571 – Business Strategy and Policy Making
Description: Case method approach to problems and policies facing top management in making and effecting a strategic plan.
MGMT 573 – Integrating Business Principles
Description: This course is designed to provide you with the opportunity to integrate your learning from the spectrum of courses taken in the MBA program and relate them to a real world business environment.
MGMT 588 - Social Entrepreneurship
Description: Focusing your business and entrepreneurial skills on social and/or environmental problem solving. Graduate-level requirements include the experience to pitch the social entrepreneruship venture they have developed. Also the graduate students will have the experience to facilitate classes.

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Management Information Systems

MIS 504 - Management of Information Technology
Description: In today's ever changing technology environment, it is critical that organizations understand how to identify, acquire and implement new technology applications to sustain competitive advantage. This course will be divided into three modules to address each of these stages, even though some of the discussion on these may overlap the entire semester, depending on the availability of the resources (external speakers, research material, etc.)
MIS 505 - IT Strategy
Description: This course is intended to provide students exposure to the issues and challenges both users and systems professionals face within the IT management arena as a part of a firm's business and IT strategy. The specific goal is for the student to learn how to Plan IT/IS options to address competitive needs, analyze business systems, using process redesign and/or reengineering methods, Investigate IT options for acquisition, design and implementation; and develop change management strategies using innovation and learning based theories.
MIS 507A - Software Design
Description: The course will begin with a discussion of techniques and notations for object-oriented modeling. Building on the modeling techniques we develop, we will then discuss strategies for implementing reusable and extensible systems. You will learn a core set of skills including polymorphic code construction, the use of inheritance and composition and design patterns.
Prerequisite(s): MIS 531A, MIS 541A or consent of instructor.
MIS 507B - Data Communications
Description: Comprehensive view of data and computer communications. Explores key issues in the field, in the general categories of principles (including basic concepts and terminology used in the field); design approaches and applications in business; standards such as the IEEE, OSI, TCP/IP and others.
MIS 511 - Social and Ethical Issues of the Internet
Description: Broad survey of the individual, organizational, cultural, social and ethical issues provoked by current and projected uses of computers. Graduate-level requirements include an additional term paper.
MIS/ENGR 512A - Management of Technology
Description: The course’s intent is to provide practical experience and perspective in the challenging and complex world of technology management. The course content will include lectures, case analysis, simulations, guest speakers, and shared personal experience from senior managers of technology-based enterprises. Major themes will include but not be limited to: strategy and tactics, market and technology driven product development, synchronization of organizations, creating real customer value, risk management, time to market, successful leadership models, and working in an international management environment. The course will include team role-playing, in depth (deep dive) analysis of product and organizational processes which have insured the sustained and successful performance of technology companies.
Typical structure: 1 hour individual studies, 1 hour lecture, 1 hour discussion.
Identical to: ENGR 512A; ENGR is home department.
MIS 513 - Business Foundations for IT
Description: This course will integrate many business foundations in support of MIS students in the MS program. In today's environment, IT solutions have to support the competitive needs of organizations and recognize the inter-organizational nature of business processes. In addition, the IT solutions have to support the financial well-being of a firm as well as its responsibility to various stakeholders. This course uses five modules: business strategy in a global environment, process analysis and re-design in an ever expanding value chain; IT in support of these business processes, economic justification, and social implications.
MIS 521 - Systems Modeling and Simulation
Description: Topics include concepts of simulation software, model validation, selecting input, probability distribution, random variate generation, statistic analysis of output data. Graduate-level requirements include an additional project.
MIS 525 - Models/Decision Support
Description: The goal of this course is to help the student become a skilled builder and consumer of models for decision support. An introduction to the application of mathematical modeling to management decisions using spreadsheets is provided. Graduate-level requirement includes an additional modeling project.
MIS 527 - Intro Enterprise Computer Env
Description: Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems represents integrated strategy for management of information among organizations, suppliers and customers. Graduate-level requirements include completion of a group project on an advanced complementary or enabling technology using ERP. Students' projects include implementation or demonstration and presentation to class.
MIS 528 - Business Process Management Systems
Description: This course introduces the latest advances in business process technologies and management such as business process planning, business process requirements analysis, business process modeling, workflow system design and implementation. The course will emphasize both theoretical issues and hands-on experiences in business process management. Graduate-level requirements include a term paper and more classroom participation in classroom discussion than the undergrads.
Prerequisite(s): MIS 531B or MIS 535 or consent of instructor
MIS 531A - Data Structure and Algorithm
Description: This course deals with the fundamental concepts of data structures and algorithms. It will cover the design, implementation and analysis of data structures and algorithms from a practical and application perspective. The basic data structures to be examined include stacks, queues, lists, trees and graphs. The course will also cover various sorting and searching algorithms. These concepts will be explored in several business programming contexts. Object-oriented adaptations of data structures and algorithms as Java classes will be discussed.
Prerequisite(s): A high-level programming language such as Java, C, orC++. (Java preferred)
MIS 531B - Database Management
Description: The course introduces the student to fundamentals of database analysis, design and implementation. Emphasis is on practical aspects of design and development. Topics covered include: conceptual design of databases using the entity relationship model, relational design and normalization. SQL and PL/SQL, web based database design, and implementation using Oracle or some other modern Database Management System. Students are required to work with a local client organization in designing and implementing a web based database application. Additional technology related to data warehouses, knowledge discovery and distributed databases is covered as well. Students will acquire hands-on-experience with a state-of-the-art database management system and web-based development tools as well as Java/C/C++.
Prerequis ite(s): MIS 531A and MIS 541A or consent of instructor.
MIS 535 - Data Management: Technology and Applications
Description: Introduction to fundamentals of database systems, design techniques and their use in organizations. Course covers relational database technology and focuses on design of database applications. Case studies will be used to illustrate the use of database systems for strategic and operational decision making. Emerging technologies and their applications will be covered. Students will get hands-on experience with state-of-the-art commercial relational and object-oriented database technology and learn to use SQL.
Prerequisite(s): basic working knowledge of computers. Not open to MS students in MIS.
MIS 538 - Software Agents and Multi-Agent Systems
Description: This course covers design, implementation, and anaylsis of software agents and multi-agent systems. It emphasizes theoretical foundations of agent-based computing and hands-on system building. Graduate-level requirements include an additional project, those taking MIS 538 are expected to work in small groups to implement a multi-agent system, turn in a substantial term project report, and present and demonstrate their implemented system in class.

MIS 540 - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

Description:  This course is an introduction to the art and science of creating computer systems that think for themselves. We will cover techniques for representing knowledge, understanding language, building autonomous agents, computer vision and robotics. Graduate-level requirements include all undergraduate requirements, plus the completion of a substantial research project that must include a related program written by the student. There will also be separate graduate level exams.
Prerequisite(s):  prior programming experience at the level of MIS 531A or C SC 318. Credit for MIS 540 or MIS 680 but not for both.
Identical to:  C SC 540.

MIS 541A - Information Systems Analysis and Design

Description:  Tools, techniques and methodologies for Business Process Re-Engineering, information systems analysis and design. Other topics to be discussed include Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems and supply chain management. Students are expected to undertake a project in a "real world" setting.
Identical to:  C SC 541A.

MIS 565 - Managing for Quality Improvement

Description:  Operational aspect of quality improvement. Topics include statistical process control, quality management programs.. Graduate-level requirements includes a report.
Identical to:  MGMT 565.

MIS 570 - Management and Evaluation of Information Systems

Description:  The methodologies of economics and management information systems are applied to the problem of designing and evaluating information systems for a profit-maximizing firm. An MBA integrative course.

Prerequisite(s):   Open only to graduate students in BPA College.

MIS 573A and B - Production and Operations Management

*MIS 573A:
Description:  Productive systems, including service type industries; activities entailed in selecting, designing, operating, controlling, and updating systems. Forecasting, aggregate planning, MRP, inventory models under uncertainty, scheduling. Graduate-level requirements include an additional term paper or program.

*MIS 573B:
Description:  Productive systems, including service type industries; activities entailed in selecting, designing, operating, controlling, and updating systems. Topics include project management, quality control, reliability, facility layout and decision theory. Case studies, group projects and industry speakers give students an understanding of human problems and quantitative methods. Graduate-level requirements include an additional term paper or program.

MIS 577 - The Supply Chain and Logistics

Description:  Organization, management and control of material flow processes; logistical strategies and relationships of procurement, handling, warehousing, transportation, and inventory control. Graduate-level requirements include an additional term paper or program.

MIS 578 - Project Management

Description:  Projects are the preferred way to get things done today in business. Course focuses on the problems and methods of running projects; special attention to information technology and software projects. Students manage real projects, use scheduling software, study cases and analytical tools. Graduate-level requirements include an additional term paper or program.

MIS 597A - Collaborative Computing

Description:  The practical application of theoretical learning within a group setting and involving an exchange of ideas and practical methods, skills, and principles.

MIS 580 - Knowledge Management: Techniques and Practices
Description:  Knowledge Management (KM) is a discipline that promotes an integrated approach to identifying, capturing, sharing and evaluating an enterprise's information and knowledge assets. This course reviews and discusses existing enabling technologies in KM and new, emerging KM technologies and practices. Such technologies are presented in the context of emerging Internet, data mining, e-commerce, and enterprise computing applications. Graduate-level requirements include an additional term paper.

MIS 596A - Special Topics in MIS

Description: The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.

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Marketing

MKTG 521 - Services Marketing Strategy
This course presents marketing concepts and strategies for organizations whose core product is service. Topics include service quality, customer attraction and retention, service delivery, and service promotion.

MKTG 530 - Management of Marketing Communication

Description:  Application of communications theory and research findings in advertising, sales promotion, publicity, personal selling; planning, conduct and administration of programs of information and persuasion.
Prerequisite(s):  MKTG 510.

MKTG 550 - Consumer and Organizational Buyer Behavior

Description: Nature of the purchase decision process for goods and services. Theories, concepts and research methods and findings are examined for use in management and public policy decision making.
Prerequisite(s):  MKTG 510.

MKTG 555 - Special Topics  in Marketing-Brand Management

Description: Addresses many of the strategic areas of brand asset management in modern business entities.  The basic objectives of this class are :increase awareness and understanding of major issues in building and managing brand assets and communicate effective frameworks for understanding brand strategy decisions, along with important streams of empirical evidence. Prerequisite(s):  MKTG 510.

MKTG 559 - Product Strategy

Description:  Formulating and implementing strategy for growth; analyzing and influencing market structure; developing, pricing, testing new entries; managing the portfolio.
Prerequisite(s):  MKTG 510.

MKTG 572 - Marketing Research

Description:  Specification of management information needs, evaluation of research proposals and findings, methods of gathering and analyzing data, administrative aspects of research and decisions.
Prerequisite(s):  MKTG 510.

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